"We are the granddaughters of the witches you weren’t able to burn."

Unknown (via veliikaya)

(Source: hairy-hag, via soucriants)

bonnsexuality:

sam-cortland:

Never apologize for your fluency in english.
If you have a different mother tongue, you are under no obligation to know english at all, let alone fluent english.
Never let anyone make you feel bad for not speaking proper english.
Be proud of your mother tongue.
Why should we learn their language when they mock and refuse to learn our own.

 (via)

(via catholicaramis)

"

When Van Gogh was a young man in his early twenties, he was in London studying to be a clergyman. He had no thought of being an artist at all. he sat in his cheap little room writing a letter to his younger brother in Holland, whom he loved very much. He looked out his window at a watery twilight, a thin lamppost, a star, and he said in his letter something like this: “it is so beautiful I must show you how it looks.” And then on his cheap ruled note paper, he made the most beautiful, tender, little drawing of it.

When I read this letter of Van Gogh’s it comforted me very much and seemed to throw a clear light on the whole road of Art. Before, I thought that to produce a work of painting or literature, you scowled and thought long and ponderously and weighed everything solemnly and learned everything that all artists had ever done aforetime, and what their influences and schools were, and you were extremely careful about *design* and *balance* and getting *interesting planes* into your painting, and avoided, with the most astringent severity, showing the faintest *academical* tendency, and were strictly modern. And so on and so on.

But the moment I read Van Gogh’s letter I knew what art was, and the creative impulse. It is a feeling of love and enthusiasm for something, and in a direct, simple, passionate and true way, you try to show this beauty in things to others, by drawing it.

And Van Gogh’s little drawing on the cheap note paper was a work of art because he loved the sky and the frail lamppost against it so seriously that he made the drawing with the most exquisite conscientiousness and care.

"

Brenda UelandIf You Want to Write: A Book about Art, Independence and Spirit (via raggedybearcat)

(Source: nyctaeus, via oddharmonics)

"My heart is an unmade bed;
it might look messy, but I swear
it’s a safe place to rest."

Moriah Pearson (via mooneyedandglowing)

This is beautiful.

(via milk-roses)

(via catholicaramis)

"Next year I will not be the self of this year now. And that is why I laugh at the transient, the ephemeral; laugh, while clutching, holding, tenderly, like a fool his toy, cracked glass, water through fingers. For all the writing, for all the invention of engines to express & convey & capture life, it is the living of it that is the gimmick. It goes by, and whatever dream you use to dope up the pains and hurts, it goes. Delude yourself about printed islands of permanence. You’ve only got so long to live. You’re getting your dream. Things are working, blind forces, no personal spiritual beneficent ones except your own intelligence and the good will of a few other fools and fellow humans. So hit it while it’s hot."

Sylvia Plath, from The Unabridged Journals Of Sylvia Plath (via ki-r)

(Source: violentwavesofemotion, via scenicroutes)

"There’s something fairy-tale-like about it, which is perfect, because fairy tales are all about innocence and ill will and the inevitability of terrible things. They’re all about the moment when the girl is no longer who she was."

Nina LaCour, Everything Leads to You

(Source: rabbitinthemoon, via elucipher)

"That’s your responsibility as a person, as a human being — to constantly be updating your positions on as many things as possible. And if you don’t contradict yourself on a regular basis, then you’re not thinking."

Malcolm Gladwell (via zerostatereflex)

(via zerostatereflex)

"Practice isn’t the thing you do once you’re good. It’s the thing you do that makes you good."

Malcolm Gladwell (via life-itself-is-a-quotation)

"Because we so profoundly personalize success, we miss opportunities to lift others onto the top rung. We make rules that frustrate achievement. We prematurely write people off as failures. We are too much in awe of those who succeed and far too dismissive of those who fail."

Malcolm Gladwell (via sinatra——blue)

"I postpone death by living, by suffering, by error, by risking, by giving, by losing."

Anaïs Nin, in a diary entry dated March 1933 (via hereticnarrative)

(via czaaritsa)